MacOS or Windows? (non-religious)

#1

I’ve been investigating some small form factor PCs and the Mac Mini for an installation. Besides the graphics performance differences, is it “better” to create OF projects for running on the PC platform or Mac? For example, is using the Kinect better on one platform or another, or are more ofx libraries and their dependencies less troublesome on Windows than MacOS? Does OpenCV work better w/ OF on one platform or another?

Thank you for sharing your perspectives.

#2

Hi,
I´ve been an apple user my whole life, but I´ve been really disapointed about its products since some years ago. I´ve have had to work on several projects using OF on windows lately and I´ve been really pleased with the performance of Visual Studio. It works much better than XCode. There are some other threads here about the topic.
As of the machines, mac minis used to be good. The size factor it is still an issue and it is not easy to find something similar as a pc but if you are able to get something that size with better hardware specs I´d go for the PC. Currently Apple computers are extremelly overpriced and it´s OS gets crappier each year.
I haven’t seen any problems on using openCV on windows. You can build a really powerful PC computer that will outperform any apple computer for a lower price than apple’s.

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#3

Completely agree w Roy. I bought an Alienware Steam Machine (alpha) a while back for 300 bucks and it’s great. Far out performs a mac mini. I think it was so cheap because they were clearing out the old inventory to make way for the newer models. It was fairly easy to get Windows installed on it (comes with SteamOS, a Linux distro for gaming). Windows 10 is great, IMO; I hated all the previous ones!

(typing this on a macbook pro… hehe)

#4

I am agree with Roy too, but that form factor is becoming more common and common in the pc arena, with several manufacturers having modern i7 or amd processors with recent integratedgraphic cards that performs much better than the mac minis I used to buy. Usually we develop in windows and deploy in linux, with only minor points to take into consideration, related to the support of some features in the graphic card, but little else.

#5

@drakko Why did you guys choose to deploy on Linux instead of Windows?

#6

I’ve also deployed several times in linux but only when no multitouch is needed. My experience with linux, multitouch and OF has not been good.
A good reason to choose linux is because it is free.

#7

Here, PC+1. I am quite pleased with NUCs. Sure you can find cheapest solutions, but have been working with them superb in several 24/7 installations. New generation intel graphics do the job.

1 Like
#8

@dmelladom Any chance you can post a link to a few you have had good success with?

#9

I still do a lot of development on macOS, because that’s the laptop I have through school, but I usually deploy installations on Linux. The PC performance is significantly better than macOS hardware for the cost. One can build an outstanding, reliable, small-form-factor PC with powerful NVidia graphics cards. Even OSX seems to have better hardware / cost possibilities when run on PC hardware via hackintosh.

#10

I have been using Mac Mini for some installations and later started to use Intel NUCs, running either Linux or Windows. Now I only use that and am very pleased by them.

#11

I’ve been on Mac OS for a really long time but got bootcamp running on my MBP last week because I needed the Windows environment for a school course. Decently pleased (and surprised!) at the performance of Win 10 so far as well as Visual Studio, even though I haven’t done any actual OF dev work on the windows side yet. But I’m sticking more and more to the Windows side of my machine and when a new project (or some need of tinkering) comes up, I’m more than willing to give Windows a go and see how it goes.

(The school course in question is an openGL/computer graphics course and Visual Studio works really well for that. No real complains yet).

100% agree with Roy on his inputs about Mac hardware and I’m hoping my next upgrade would be a Razer Blade - excellent hardware in a beautiful form factor. Expensive, yes, but looks like it has everything for my needs. Don’t have the money for that particular upgrade any time soon though :wink:

#12

hey, one question giving the possibility to upgrade from a mac book pro 2011 to a 2015 because my gfxcard is dying slowly, will you do it? or will you jump to a new one 2017 mac book pro ?
i have to change soon but not sure what to do i been checking the razor blade but i wonder what linux version work better with that hardware to any advise?
thanks

#13

I’d like to try to steer this thread back to the main topic of how libraries, dependencies, hardware and just “getting things working” tends to be easier on Windows vs MacOS (or Linux).

#14

On mac is easier in my experience , on linux it gets trickier sometimes i had issues with ofxaddons on linux nothing major but most of the times things don’t work as they are suppose to but i see no problem with both plataforms

#15

License price, stability and some times better performance. Also you have much better control of what happens in the OS level (as updates, installed modules etc) that Windows 10.

#16

So… Mac, Windows or linux

#17

I have been using Open Frameworks for a while now, in Linux, Windows/Visual Studio, Mac/Xcode, and Android Studio. They have all been working pretty well - I think Android Studio is worst, because of Android Studio.

Mac and Windows have so far both been easy to me, and I can move the code of my projects from one to another and have them work right away - very nice!

#18

i just move into manjaro linux on a razer blade 15, everything looks good it works out of the box , only the nvidia needs to be set or on unset with optimus driver, you have to choose which one you one to use similar to mac os x gfxcardstatus that used to have as my gpu macbook pro 2010 when my gpu die a couple of years ago.