installer - first impressions

You know, there are lots of opensource install methods on the market now.

I just installed OF, [I think] and this is rather off-putting.

Also: updates?

Even SVN has update and GUI mechanisms. Pick one?

I’ve been programming for decades and I’m trying to get up into higher code models, further from the ‘machine’ ala Java and object code. I can work faster and smarter.

It’s good to know the machine… ‘hi howya doin?’ but for development that is not exact processor based, nor application specific such that it requires low level code, why are we still doing this?

I saw the video. That’s why I’m here. The install process alone is nearly enough to make me think twice about it.

I’m getting to be an older hack, and I like to get right to my stated goals rather than having to mod the kernel before I can even get working. My programming needs have evolved:

  1. Usability
  2. Speed
  3. Configurable
  4. Consistent
  5. Upgradable

TY. Now I will start trying to get this beast to run…

thanks for the comments. it’s open source. there is a community here. jump in and fix stuff if you want.

you sound like you know what you want, so…

[quote author=“DEMOPOLY”]You know, there are lots of opensource install methods on the market now.

I just installed OF, [I think] and this is rather off-putting.
[/quote]

as a long-time developer i really dislike dev tools with installation programs. i don’t know where it’s putting stuff, and i need to dig around to find it. with oF, it’s all there, all in one place.

you’re developing C++ now. it’s friendly C++, and it holds your hand a lot more than raw C++, and the community support is here if you ask nicely; but it’s still C++.

Also: updates?

personally, i have (a part of) the oF tree hooked up to SVN; for new versions i can just go ‘svn update’. but, oF is still in prerelease (this is why there is no direct link to the download page from the homepage); at the moment the paths and some of the naming conventions (especially around the addons system) are still in flux, and a project built against 0.04 won’t compile against 0.05 without a bunch of changes.

but as Zach says, it’s open source; jump in and make changes if you want.

It’s good to know the machine… ‘hi howya doin?’ but for development that is not exact processor based, nor application specific such that it requires low level code, why are we still doing this?

because it’s C++, and you get the most out of C++ when you know how the low-level stuff works. for instance, most openFrameworks programmers coming from another development platform, or new to programming, have to come into contact with the ‘pointer’ concept at a fairly early stage in development; this is vital for an understanding of C++, and there isn’t really any way around it. if you want the performance boost that C++ offers, you have to work for it. openFrameworks does a lot of this work for you, but at the end it’s up to you.

good luck, and come back and ask questions when you get stuck.